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JioPhone Launched — Price FREE ₹0 — Plans and Availability — India ka Smartphone

Namaskaar Dosto, is video mein maine aapse Jio Phone ki baare mein baat ki hai, JioPhone free mein launch kiya hai 1500Rs upfront fir refund milega 36months ke baad, 153Rs ka naya plan bhi launch kiya gaya hai. JioPhone KE LIYE 24th August se pre booking start ho jayengi. Yeh video JioPhone ki unboxing ya review nahi hai sird ek informational video hai jaha maine aapse JioPhone ki details share ki hai. JioPhone FREE mein milega aapko effectively kyuki aapko bas ek deposit karna hoga 1500Rs ka jo 3Years ke baad refundable hoga. 15th AUgust se Jio Phone ki testing shuru hogi aur 24th August se normal users MyJioApp se ya Jio Digital Store isko Prebook kar sakte hai. Jio is phone ko har week almost 5Million numbers mien manufacture karne ka plan kar raha hai. Mujhe umeed hai ki aapko yeh video pasand aayegi.

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Nice Best Smartphone photos

Check out these Best Smartphone images:

Concentration
Best Smartphone
Image by Ed Yourdon
Note: this photo was published in a Mar 11, 2014 blog titled "古いiPhoneの体感速度がiOS 7.1になるとアップすることが判明."

*******************************************

Unlike most of my other iPhone photos thus far, this one was not taken anywhere in New York City. Instead, it was taken in the Costa Rica airport (near the city of Liberia, if it matters to you), while waiting a few hours for our delayed flight back to New York City.

Interestingly, I had one of my other cameras (the pocket-sized Sony RX-100 MkII) with me, and I was wandering around the terminal area, taking dozens of photos of bored, restless passengers as they waited (FWIW, a subset of those photos have also been uploaded to Flickr, but they’re restricted to "friends and family"; if you would like an "invitation" to see them, send me an email). But when I saw this scene, I figured that I only had a second or two to capture it before the little girl changed positions, or began chatting with her father (who was sitting just out of the frame of this photo). So I decided to use my iPhone instead …

Obviously, a lot of people are using their iPhones these days to take "serious" photos, where it’s obvious to them, and to anyone else who happens to be looking, that they intend to take a photo. But the vast majority of my street-photography scenes involve unplanned, unexpected, ad hoc, and somewhat "anonymous" (or "hidden") efforts to photograph a scene. And while the Sony RX-100 Mk II camera is indeed compact and unobtrusive, it still looks like a camera, if anyone (e.g., the little girl in this photo) happens to be looking at me.

OTOH, when you’re holding a phone, you could be doing almost anything … and I don’t think it occurs to many people that you’re actually pointing a camera lens at them and snapping a picture. Of course, this little girl wasn’t paying any attention to me at all … but I suspect her Dad (in his rightfully protective role as a father) was indeed looking, if only in a half-conscious "horizon-scanning" fashion. Hence my use of the iPhone…

A technical note: even though I shot this photo with an iPhoto, and thus should not expect any kind of miraculous quality, I couldn’t resist tinkering with the results a little. I tend to crop color-correct all of my photos without even thinking about it; but I also sharpened this photo, and also used "NoiseNinja" to reduce the noise in the photo.

I don’t know why there was any noise at all, considering that (according to the EXIF data provided by the iPhone5s), it was shot at a low ISO of 80. But It was also shot at a slow shutter speed of 1/30th second, and with a wide-open aperture of f/2.2 (all chosen automatically by the camera, without any intention or awareness on my part), so the post-processing of sharpening and noise-correction may have been helpful. The final result, shown here, is still obviously somewhat grainy and noisy, but I’m not trying to win any photo competitions; I’m just trying to show an ad hoc, everyday scene.

That being the case, I did decide to select this photo (among the many hundreds I shot that day) as my "photo of the day" for Feb 8, 2014. So there.

**********************

Whether you’re an amateur or professional photographer, it’s hard to walk around with a modern smartphone in your pocket, and not be tempted to use the built-in camera from time-to-time. Veteran photographers typically sneer at such behavior, and most will tell you that they can instantly recognize an iPhone photo, which they mentally reject as being unworthy of any serious attention.

After using many earlier models of smartphones over the past several years, I was inclined to agree; after all, I always (well, almost always) had a “real” phone in my pocket (or backpack or camera-bag), and it was always capable of taking a much better photographic image than the mediocre, grainy images shot with a camera-phone.

But still … there were a few occasions when I desperately wanted to capture some photo-worthy event taking place right in front of me, and inevitably it turned out to be the times when I did not have the “real” camera with me. Or I did have it, but it was buried somewhere in a bag, and I knew that the “event” would have disappeared by the time I found the “real" camera and turned it on. By contrast, the smart-phone was always in my pocket (along with my keys and my wallet, it’s one of the three things I consciously grab every time I walk out the door). And I often found that I could turn it on, point it at the photographic scene, and take the picture much faster than I could do the same thing with a “traditional” camera.

Meanwhile, smartphone cameras have gotten substantially better in the past few years, from a mechanical/hardware perspective; and the software “intelligence” controlling the camera has become amazingly sophisticated. It’s still not on the same level as a “professional” DSLR camera, but for a large majority of the “average” photographic situations we’re likely to encounter in the unplanned moments of our lives, it’s more and more likely to be “good enough.” The old adage of “the best camera is the one you have with you” is more and more relevant these days. For me, 90% of the success in taking a good photo is simply being in the right place at the right time, being aware that the “photo opportunity” is there, and having a camera — any camera — to take advantage of that opportunity. Only 10% of the time does it matter which camera I’m using, or what technical features I’ve managed to use.

And now, with the recent advent of the iPhone5s, there is one more improvement — which, as far as I can tell, simply does not exist in any of the “professional” cameras. You can take an unlimited number of “burst-mode” shots with the new iPhone, simply by keeping your finger on the shutter button; instead of being limited to just six (as a few of the DSLR cameras currently offer), you can take 10, 20, or even a hundred shots. And then — almost magically — the iPhone will show you which one or two of the large burst of photos was optimally sharp and clear. With a couple of clicks, you can then delete everything else, and retain only the very best one or two from the entire burst.

With that in mind, I’ve begun using my iPhone5s for more and more “everyday” photo situations out on the street. Since I’m typically photographing ordinary, mundane events, even the one or two “optimal” shots that the camera-phone retains might not be worth showing anyone else … so there is still a lot of pruning and editing to be done, and I’m lucky if 10% of those “optimal” shots are good enough to justify uploading to Flickr and sharing with the rest of the world. Still, it’s an enormous benefit to know that my editing work can begin with photos that are more-or-less “technically” adequate, and that I don’t have to waste even a second reviewing dozens of technically-mediocre shots that are fuzzy, or blurred.

Oh, yeah, one other minor benefit of the iPhone5s (and presumably most other current brands of smartphone): it automatically geotags every photo and video, without any special effort on the photographer’s part. Only one of my other big, fat cameras (the Sony Alpha SLT A65) has that feature, and I’ve noticed that almost none of the “new” mirrorless cameras have got a built-in GPS thingy that will perform the geotagging…

I’ve had my iPhone5s for a couple of months now, but I’ve only been using the “burst-mode” photography feature aggressively for the past couple of weeks. As a result, the initial batch of photos that I’m uploading are all taken in the greater-NYC area. But as time goes on, and as my normal travel routine takes me to other parts of the world, I hope to add more and more “everyday” scenes in cities that I might not have the opportunity to photograph in a “serious” way.

Stay tuned….

Wet Asphalt and Pink Sky
Best Smartphone
Image by geraldbrazell
We finally got a brief shower this afternoon. We really need a long slow rain to catch up due to the drought. This photo was taken this evening at a strip mall in NE Columbia, SC.

SOOC (smartphone)

Alas, they were not giving away computers at Best Buy.

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Cool Best Smartphone images

Some cool Best Smartphone images:

New Yorkers prefer to look cool and stylish, and just pretend they can read their smartphone …
Best Smartphone
Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken at the corner of Christopher & Bedford Street in Greenwich Village.

Note: this photo was published in a Feb 23, 2015 blog titled "Ignore your FOMO — missing out can be a good thing." It was also published in an Apr 30, 2015 blog titled "La era post-PC es más real que nunca: más usuarios sólo-móvil que sólo-escritorio en EEUU." And it was published in a May 11,2015 blog titled "Business Insider is hiring gadget-obsessed editors and reporters." It was also published in a May 30, 2015 blog titled "Selfie PSA."

***************

This set of photos is based on a very simple concept: walk every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what happens. To avoid missing anything, walk both sides of the street.

That’s all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be more ambitious, you could also walk the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s more than I’m willing to commit to at this point, and I’ll leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, more adventurous photographers.

Oh, actually, there’s one more small detail: leave the photos alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I actually focus on the first of these "every-block" photos, I will have taken more than 8,000 images on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus another several thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the various spots in NYC where I traditionally take photos. So I don’t expect to be emotionally attached to any of the "every-block" photos, and hope that I’ll be able to make an objective selection of the ones worth looking at.

As for the criteria that I’ve used to select the small subset of every-block photos that get uploaded to Flickr: there are three. First, I’ll upload any photo that I think is "great," and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-friends will be, "I have no idea when or where that photo was taken, but it’s really a terrific picture!"

A second criterion has to do with place, and the third involves time. I’m hoping that I’ll take some photos that clearly say, "This is New York!" to anyone who looks at it. Obviously, certain landscape icons like the Empire State Building or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion; but I’m hoping that I’ll find other, more unexpected examples. I hope that I’ll be able to take some shots that will make a "local" viewer say, "Well, even if that’s not recognizable to someone from another part of the country, or another part of the world, I know that that’s New York!" And there might be some photos where a "non-local" viewer might say, "I had no idea that there was anyplace in New York City that was so interesting/beautiful/ugly/spectacular."

As for the sense of time: I remember wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing various shops, stores, restaurants, and business establishments — and then casually looking at the photos about five years later, and being stunned by how much had changed. Little by little, store by store, day by day, things change … and when you’ve been around as long as I have, it’s even more amazing to go back and look at the photos you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask yourself, "Was it really like that back then? Seriously, did people really wear bell-bottom jeans?"

So, with the expectation that I’ll be looking at these every-block photos five or ten years from now (and maybe you will be, too), I’m going to be doing my best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they were taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no idea what we’re calling this decade yet). Or maybe they’ll just say to us, "This is what it was like a dozen years after 9-11".

Movie posters are a trivial example of such a time-specific image; I’ve already taken a bunch, and I don’t know if I’ll ultimately decide that they’re worth uploading. Women’s fashion/styles are another obvious example of a time-specific phenomenon; and even though I’m definitely not a fashion expert, I suspected that I’ll be able to look at some images ten years from now and mutter to myself, "Did we really wear shirts like that? Did women really wear those weird skirts that are short in the front, and long in the back? Did everyone in New York have a tattoo?"

Another example: I’m fascinated by the interactions that people have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that everyone has one, which certainly wasn’t true a decade ago; and it seems that everyone walks down the street with their eyes and their entire conscious attention riveted on this little box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about anything else that might be going on (among other things, that makes it very easy for me to photograph them without their even noticing, particularly if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a phone conversation). But I can’t help wondering whether this kind of social behavior will seem bizarre a decade from now … especially if our cellphones have become so miniaturized that they’re incorporated into the glasses we wear, or implanted directly into our eyeballs.

Oh, one last thing: I’ve created a customized Google Map to show the precise details of each day’s photo-walk. I’ll be updating it each day, and the most recent part of my every-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it each day to see where I’ve been, by clicking on this link

URL link to Ed’s every-block progress through Manhattan

If you have any suggestions about places that I should definitely visit to get some good photos, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your little corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can email me directly at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Stay tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

You think you’re good at online Scrabble? Well, I just put «syzygy» on the board — see if you can beat that!
Best Smartphone
Image by Ed Yourdon
This is a continuation of a series of subway photos that I began in 2009-2010, which you can find here and here on Flickr, and which I’ve continued — on a station-by-station basis — in 2011. The photos in this set were taken in the 116th Street (Pennsylvania Station) IRT station (Columbia University), on the uptown platform, in January 2011.

Note: this photo was published in an undated (Jan 29, 2011) Everyblock NYC zipcodes blog titled "10027."

Moving into 2012, the photo was published in a Jan 5, 2012 blog titled "Tecnoesclavos." It was also published in a May 25, 2012 blog titled "The Omnibus Roundup – Seward Park, Mayoral Race Transit Talk, Harvesting Methane and Studying Smart Phones."

Moving into 2014, the photo was published in an Apr 24, 2014 blog titled "Si Puó Vivere Senza Smartphoe? Ci provo con quest nova #Sfida30Giorni," as well as a blog titled "Mars Express, Phobos and the occult … ation." It was also published in an Aug 11, 2014 blog titled "Your Phone’s Hardware Can Reveal Your Identity Even If Your Data Is Safe."

********************************

Over the years, I’ve seen various photos of the NYC subway "scene," usually in a relatively grim, dark, black-and-white format. But during a spring 2009 class on street photography at the NYC International Center of Photography (ICP), I saw lots and lots of terrific subway shots taken by my fellow classmates … so I was inspired to start taking some myself.

One of the reasons I rarely, if ever, took subway photos before 2009 is that virtually every such photo I ever saw was in black-and-white. I know that some people are fanatics about B/W photography as a medium; and I respect their choice. And I took quite a lot of B/W photographs of my own in the late 60s and early 70s, especially when I had my own little makeshift darkroom for printing my own photos.

But for most of the past 40 years, I’ve focused mostly on color photography. As for photos of subways, I don’t feel any need to make the scene look darker and grimier than it already is, by restricting it to B/W. Indeed, one of the things I find quite intriguing is that there is a lot of color in this environment, and it’s not too hard to give some warmth and liveliness to the scene…

To avoid disruption, and to avoid drawing attention to myself, I’m not using flash shots; but because of the relatively low level of lighting, I’m generally using an ISO setting of 3200 or 6400, depending on which camera I’m using. As a result, some of the shots are a little grainy — but it’s a compromise that I’m willing to make.

Thus far in 2011, I’ve been using a small, compact "pocket" camera == the Canon G-12 — in contrast to the somewhat large, bulky Nikon D300 and D700 DSLRs that I used predominately in 2009 anbd 2010. If I’m photographing people on the other side of the tracks in a subway station, there’s no problem holding up the camera, composing the shot, and taking it in full view of everyone. But if I’m taking photos inside a subway car or photos of people on the same side of the platform where I’m standing, I normally set the camera lens to a wide angle (18mm or 24mm) setting, point it in the general direction of the subject(s), and shoot without framing or composing.

What I find most interesting about the scenes photographed here is how isolated most people seem to be. Of course, there are sometimes couples, or families, or groups of school-children; but by far the most common scene is an individual standing alone, waiting for a train to arrive. He or she may be reading a book, or listening to music, or (occasionally) talking to someone on a cellphone; but often they just stare into space, lost in their own thoughts. Some look happy, some look sad; but the most common expression is a blank face and a vacant stare. It’s almost as if people go into a state of suspended animation when they descend underground into the subway — and they don’t resume their normal expression, behavior, and mannerisms until they emerge back above-ground at the end of their ride.

Anyway, this is what it looks like down underground … or at least, this is what it’s like in the stations I’ve visited and photographed so far. If I feel energetic enough in 2011, maybe I’ll try to photograph people in every subway station. It would be interesting to see what kind of variety can be seen…

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Overview of the Best Smartphone

Best Smartphone
by danielsteuri

Overview of the Best Smartphone

It can be difficult to draw to an assumption on what the best Smartphone are. That is because for one thing, different folk have different ideas about what makes something the best. For another thing, the technology is moving so speedily that the best Smartphone of nowadays are being quickly replaced.

Therefore you usually have to recollect the best Smartphone are the ones that fit your requirements. What are you actually looking for from your Smartphone? Are you attempting to find the very best quality pictures, sound and videos? Or are you searching for the easiest web browsing?

Perhaps you have an interest in having access to the best games. Or maybe you are looking for a tilt screen that permits you to fundamentally have a small laptop with you at every point. Folks use their phones in all kinds of different ways, so the best Smartphone for them aren’t always the right ones for you to choose between.

The most well known of the finest Smartphone is the Apple iPhone. It’s the most recent release from Apple and it plays on plenty of the features that people loved about the newest iPods and Macs. There have been many models and updates, and now they’re extremely tough and flexible.

On the other hand, some people are not happy with the iPhone as part of the best Smartphone. That is due to the fact that the new models and upgrades come out so fast it’s hard to keep up with it all. In addition, many people like to keep their distance from such popular trends.

That’s the reason why the latest Blackberry models are getting solid reviews. They definitely deserve mention among the best Smartphone. Blackberry has a long record of developing feature rich PDAs with email and calling functionality, and their new models mix that experience with everything else that folk have started to expect from a cell phone such as games, an electronic camera and more.

One of the hottest of the finest Smartphone is the ATT tilt. The tilt is unique naturally for the screen itself, which tilts up about halfway to allow you to easily read and browse. It’s a convenient feature that helps it to stand aside from the bunch.

Naturally there are plenty of other available models that some people would put into the best Smartphone category. Nokia, Samsung and Palm all have fantastic options, and again it depends on your specific needs, along with which cell phone carrier you plan on contracting with.

Don’t worry about what other people say in regards to the best Smartphone. Someone else’s opinion is just that, their view. So when it comes to the great Smartphone just be sure that you pick a model that matches your express interests and intended uses.

Before you buy smart phone card , Make efforts to confirm Michael Mockexcellent reviews at his. tilt smartphone blog

Find More Best Smartphone Articles

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Get the Best Smartphone for the Deaf to Enjoy Life

Best Smartphone
by Neil. Moralee

Get the Best Smartphone for the Deaf to Enjoy Life

The advent of smart phone technology has made the deaf community no longer alien to mobile phones. Like any normal person with all the senses, a deaf person can use the smart phones for any purpose like surfing the net, playing the games, emailing or social networking. It is not finished yet; they can also do video chat with the smart phones. It has been made possible with ASL, the sign language deaf people use to converse through a video chat. All of these innovations have made the life of the deaf much easier and they can enjoy the new technology without any fuss.

As video technology has evolved with time, deaf and hearing impaired people are getting more options for communication and have to depend less on relay services such as TTY or VRS. The text-based communication and the availability of mobile devices make it a lot easier to communicate with hearing people when a deaf person needs to have a short exchange. They can see the expressions and response with whom they are talking with. It can be used as one-hand holding the phone’s self facing camera, while the other hand doing ASL.

Many of the smart phone developers took special care in developing their devices which caters to a wide section of people including the people with certain disabilities. One of the most common smart phones prevalent in the market is iPhone which has many features which you may not know as a normal person. There are a few useful tools an iPhone offers like dictation, speak screen, Siri, zoom, font adjustments, inversion of colors, and Braille displays which offers a wide range of features for people with different needs. iPhones are accessible for those who are hearing impaired, have physical challenges in addition to those who have specific challenges and other cognitive and learning disabilities.

So, for all the deaf community, it is time to enjoy the modern technology which has given you so much freedom to communicate. You can get the best smartphone for the deaf by searching online as many of the dealers are offering them there. You can order deaf iPhone online which comes loaded with so many features for the visually impaired. Similarly, Android phones are most commonly used today and you can have deaf Android phone online. You can get the phones with specific accessories needed so that it is easier to use.

The writer is a blogger. This article is about smart phone technology for the hearing impaired.

For more information visit: www.flygrip.com

Related Best Smartphone Articles

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Let Flygrip Help You Buy The Best Smartphone Case For The Deaf

Best Smartphone
by CommScope

Let Flygrip Help You Buy The Best Smartphone Case For The Deaf

Mobile technology has brought drastic changes in people’s lives. Whether for shopping stuff online, playing games, listening to music or social networking, smartphones have become one of the most significant elements or anything that it can be called that people cannot imagine their lives without. Be it a school-going kid or an IT professional, every person wants to makes the best of their smartphone to carry out numerous tasks. Even individuals, who are deaf or hard of hearing, can make good usage of smartphone to do things that were once unimaginable. Email, texts, and instant messaging is quite easy for deaf or hearing impaired people, but video chatting has become a convenience too!

Yes, deaf people can use their smartphones to communicate with the help of video chats. The perfect combination of ASL and Flygrip can make that happen. Firstly, let’s shed some light on ASL. So, basically ASL or American Sign Language is the predominant sign language of deaf communities in the United States as well as most of anglophone Canada. It originated in the 19th century in the American School for the Deaf (ASD) in Hartford from a situation of language contact. Also, it comprises a vast number of phonemic components along with the movement of the face & torso and the hands as well. Deaf people possessing thorough knowledge about ASL can easily go for the option of video chat whenever and wherever they want to. Making use of ASL not only simplifies, but speeds up the entire conversation as well. But, it is the usage of Flygrip that makes the video chatting experience much better. Flygrip is the preference of one and all and it is because it allows selfie video chatting in a brilliant manner. You can easily hold the phone’s self facing camera an arm’s length away from one hand and use ASL from the other hand. It is the Flygrip’s kickstand feature that helps in conducting full blown video chat. Also, one doesn’t have to worry about dropping the phone while communicating through video chats. Last but not the least; Flygrip eliminates the need to buy heavy, bulky cases that become a cause of hand cramps.

So, if you think Flygrip can help you improve your communication in an incredible way, buy Flygrip, the best smartphone case for the deaf without any delay. Those looking forward to buy this deaf smartphone case online, visit the website of Flygrip. Flygrip not only offers deaf android phone case online, but also numerous other accessories that would be of great use to you. So, what are you waiting for? Browse Flygrip’s site now!

The author is an avid blogger. This article is about buying Flygrip case for deaf people.

For more information visit: www.flygrip.com

Related Best Smartphone Articles

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Cool Best Smartphone images

A few nice Best Smartphone images I found:

20.01.14 (Creative 365)
Best Smartphone
Image by michelle-robinson.com
facebook.com/michmutters

~ 20.01.14 ~ .
‘one to wonder’

maybe it’s enough sometimes just to know
and sometimes maybe it’s best to let go
instead of chasing dreams and ghosts
and things that may never really be what they seem
it all leads one to wonder if we really know
when something is real
or if we’re just entranced by the need to feel
that there’s something special there to hold on to
to stop ourselves from slipping or breaking in two
— albert the insider aka Nick White .

#creative365_michmutters_2014 .

#procamera7, #snapseed, Blurfx, Litho, Camera Awesome, Wood Camera, Image Blender, #Decim8 #ampt_community

Siri
Best Smartphone
Image by tamouse
After reeducation about best smartphone: news.cnet.com/8301-13579_3-57433626-37/siri-changes-her-m…

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Record Secret Video In Android locked Screen / Best Secret Video Recorder app / Mobile / Smartphone

Record secret videos as background recording in your android phone and tablet. आप किस तरह अपने एंड्राइड मोबाइल से छुपके और चोरी से VIDEO बना सकते है.

How To Record Secret Video In Android With locked Screen
Video Rating: / 5

Transcend’s DrivePro 220 Car Video Recorder is your most reliable eyewitness on the road. The recorder’s built-in battery, emergency recording, F1.8 aperture lens, snapshot feature, bright 2.4″ color LCD screen all ensure excellent user-experience. In addition, with useful features including GPS receiver, Lane Departure Warning System (LDWS), Forward Collision Warning System (FCWS), Speed Alarm and Parking Mode, the DrivePro 220 offers the optimum driving safety.

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Best Budget smartphone di Malaysia bawah RM900 2016

Xiaomi adalah brand smartphone yang popular hampir dgn samsung dan smartphone xiaomi ni mempunyai semua criteria flagship pada 2014 dan aku rasa redmi 3s adalah lebih baik daripada flagship pada tahun 2014. apa kata korang? let me know if you agree or not in the comment section

xiaomi redmi 3s Malaysia: http://ho.lazada.com.my/SHJ6Qa

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Lastest Best Smartphone News

New Yorkers like their cameras, but they *love* their dogs
Best Smartphone
Image by Ed Yourdon
This photo was taken on 9th Ave and 22nd Street.

Note: I chose this as my "photo of the day" for June 29, 2014. What can I say … I like red.

***************

This set of photos is based on a very simple concept: walk every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what happens. To avoid missing anything, walk both sides of the street.

That’s all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be more ambitious, you could also walk the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s more than I’m willing to commit to at this point, and I’ll leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, more adventurous photographers.

Oh, actually, there’s one more small detail: leave the photos alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I actually focus on the first of these "every-block" photos, I will have taken more than 8,000 images on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus another several thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the various spots in NYC where I traditionally take photos. So I don’t expect to be emotionally attached to any of the "every-block" photos, and hope that I’ll be able to make an objective selection of the ones worth looking at.

As for the criteria that I’ve used to select the small subset of every-block photos that get uploaded to Flickr: there are three. First, I’ll upload any photo that I think is "great," and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-friends will be, "I have no idea when or where that photo was taken, but it’s really a terrific picture!"

A second criterion has to do with place, and the third involves time. I’m hoping that I’ll take some photos that clearly say, "This is New York!" to anyone who looks at it. Obviously, certain landscape icons like the Empire State Building or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion; but I’m hoping that I’ll find other, more unexpected examples. I hope that I’ll be able to take some shots that will make a "local" viewer say, "Well, even if that’s not recognizable to someone from another part of the country, or another part of the world, I know that that’s New York!" And there might be some photos where a "non-local" viewer might say, "I had no idea that there was anyplace in New York City that was so interesting/beautiful/ugly/spectacular."

As for the sense of time: I remember wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing various shops, stores, restaurants, and business establishments — and then casually looking at the photos about five years later, and being stunned by how much had changed. Little by little, store by store, day by day, things change … and when you’ve been around as long as I have, it’s even more amazing to go back and look at the photos you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask yourself, "Was it really like that back then? Seriously, did people really wear bell-bottom jeans?"

So, with the expectation that I’ll be looking at these every-block photos five or ten years from now (and maybe you will be, too), I’m going to be doing my best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they were taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no idea what we’re calling this decade yet). Or maybe they’ll just say to us, "This is what it was like a dozen years after 9-11".

Movie posters are a trivial example of such a time-specific image; I’ve already taken a bunch, and I don’t know if I’ll ultimately decide that they’re worth uploading. Women’s fashion/styles are another obvious example of a time-specific phenomenon; and even though I’m definitely not a fashion expert, I suspected that I’ll be able to look at some images ten years from now and mutter to myself, "Did we really wear shirts like that? Did women really wear those weird skirts that are short in the front, and long in the back? Did everyone in New York have a tattoo?"

Another example: I’m fascinated by the interactions that people have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that everyone has one, which certainly wasn’t true a decade ago; and it seems that everyone walks down the street with their eyes and their entire conscious attention riveted on this little box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about anything else that might be going on (among other things, that makes it very easy for me to photograph them without their even noticing, particularly if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a phone conversation). But I can’t help wondering whether this kind of social behavior will seem bizarre a decade from now … especially if our cellphones have become so miniaturized that they’re incorporated into the glasses we wear, or implanted directly into our eyeballs.

Oh, one last thing: I’ve created a customized Google Map to show the precise details of each day’s photo-walk. I’ll be updating it each day, and the most recent part of my every-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it each day to see where I’ve been, by clicking on this link

URL link to Ed’s every-block progress through Manhattan

If you have any suggestions about places that I should definitely visit to get some good photos, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your little corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can email me directly at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Stay tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

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